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New Report: Anything But Natural: Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) Infrastructure Expansion Threats to Coastal & Marine Ecosystems

Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) Infrastructure Expansion Threats to Coastal & Marine Ecosystems

Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) is a big threat to the environment, and to the global climate as well. The construction of dozens of LNG terminals in Batangas, and the increase in passage of boats in the Verde Island Passage alone in the Philippines is a very scary scenario. LNG should never be a transition fuel. It is not a renewable energy.

David D’Angelo, National President, greenparty.ph

New maps and analysis from Earth Insight and partners (see above) paint a sobering picture of current plans to expand Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) infrastructure worldwide, posing threats to the global climate as well as significant hubs for biodiversity.

The cost of developing planned natural gas infrastructure exceeds one trillion dollars and will increase by threefold the world’s export capacity, and by two-thirds its import capacity. The United States, Russia, China, Mexico, and Canada are leading the pack in planned LNG infrastructure expansion, while countries like the Philippines, Mozambique, and Brazil also feature in the top 20.

READ THE REPORT — Anything But Natural: Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) Infrastructure Expansion Threats to Coastal & Marine Ecosystems

In the United States, developments along the Gulf Coast will disproportionately impact communities of color in some of the poorer states of the country. These communities already experience poor air quality from operating LNG facilities and regularly suffer downpours and floods caused by climate change-fueled hurricanes and storms;

In Mexico’s Baja California state, new LNG infrastructure threatens “the world’s aquarium,” home to 40% of all marine mammals in the world and many endangered species. If current plans go ahead, eight new terminals will be built in a region that is a whale sanctuary and is listed as a UNESCO World heritage site;

In the Philippines, building new LNG terminals will add more pressure to the Verde Island Passage, one of the world’s most biodiverse marine places. The region, often called “the Amazon of the Oceans,” is already one of the world’s busiest marine routes and was hit by an oil spill in 2023 with devastating consequences;

In Mozambique and East Africa, gas developments have already caused the forced displacement of local communities and new plans threaten several critically endangered marine species. The offshore expansion will take place along a coastline full of mangroves and coral reefs;

and, in Brazil, there are plans to build new LNG terminals along the Atlantic coast, a region that is already cluttered with oil and gas infrastructure. Whale populations will be particularly affected, as the new developments overlap with their breeding grounds and migration routes.

More Resources

  • Look at the interactive heatmap here.
  • Download static maps from the report here.
  • Supplied underwater images of marine life (credit Lynsey Grosfield/Earth Insight) here.

Source:

Florencia Librizzi
Program Director
571-319-6365
www.earth-insight.org

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